What I learnt from hosting my first Twitter Chat

4 facts you must know about Twitter  

  • In January 2018, there were about 330 millionTwitter users, about a 4% increase over the previous year.
  • 37% of Twitter users are millennials.
  • The average person has 702 followers.
  • Twitter users were between 25and 34 years old. The second-largest user group were 35 to 44 year olds with a 19.5 percent share.

 

What is a Twitter Chat?

Buffer defines a Twitter Chat as ‘a group of Twitter users meet at a pre-determined time to discuss a certain topic, using a designated hashtag (#) for each tweet contributed. A host or moderator will pose questions (designated with Q1, Q2…) to prompt responses from participants (using A1, A2…) and encourage interaction among the group. Chats typically last an hour.’

 

Why did I start a Twitter Chat?

I wanted to build my engagement on Twitter and looking for ways to connect with people online. I have been on Twitter since 2012.

I am an Executive and Leadership Coach and I use the skills and knowledge I have acquired in my 20+ years in the Public Sector where I managed multi-million pound budgets. Now I work with other leaders who want to improve their own performance and that of their own teams so I am keen to connect with those leaders. When I am creating content on a daily basis, I think of them. Today, I have 46 blog posts and Vlogs on my website that can help solve my prospective clients’ problems.

I am also keen to connect with my fellow Executive and Leadership Coaches or colleagues who work in communication who have a similar audience to mine.

 

How did I prepare for it?

I learn from studying, reading and from others. My mentor for this has been Janet Murray (@jan_murray). I can honestly say that without Janet, I would never have done this. The idea became possible because she gave me a system and confidence to dare. I follow Kawula (@MikeKawula), Kim Garst (@kimgarst), Sam Flynn (@Samflynn) who educate me about social media.

I listened to 3 podcast episodes:

Episode 133: How to grow your following on Twitter with Mika Kawula. My main learning points were:

  • Tweet more than once a day. I did not know that Mike Kawula was tweeting one of his blog posts twice an hour for example, or that he was tweeting quotes from his book. It gave me quite a few ideas with my own content.
  • Tweet a lot more than you think you can and share valuable content.
  • Make use of the pinned post.

Episode 214: How to get more engagement on Twitter. My main learning points were:

  • Send videos messages along with a Tweet every day before the event.
  • Be active and not passive. I started to tag people who I know would be interested.
  • Comment on other people’s accounts. Create a Twitter list (10 influencers in your list). Spend 5 or 10 minutes on Twitter every day, share and replay and get the conversation going.
  • Get involved on Twitter Chat, so I did just that with Janet’s #soulfurPRhour and more recently #contenthour.
  • Get people to host your Twitter Chat and look at potential business collaboration. I have not done this yet but I have a few colleagues in mind.
  • Use people to talk to for case studies and articles.
  • Use hashtags that relate to your areas of expertise then have a look at the account and see if they share content. This is part of my daily routine. Trello is good to keep a log for this.

Episode 151: How to use Twitter Chat to promote your business with Sian Conway. My main learning points were:

  • Check if your # is being used and if not then use it.
  • Send people a message to see if they are interested in getting involved.
  • At the end of each Twitter Chat, suggest topics and put it in a Twitter poll and pin it to your Twitter profile.
  • It is OK to repeat a topic.
  • It’s normal to fear that nobody is going to turn up and that you are going to be talking to yourself at 9pm. I felt exactly like this in this first Twitter Chat.
  • Make sure that you get people on board.
  • It’s not a one hour a week’s job to do a Twitter Chat. It involves a lot of work during the week. It is a big commitment when you do it weekly.
  • Remind people to use the hashtag.
  • She uses articles from around the web and throws them in the chat.

I read Janet’s blog post: How to take part in a Twitter chat (and why it’s good PR for your business). Janet mentions using apps to follow the Twitter Chat such as Hootsuite, Tweetdeck. I did not use those. My plan was to use TweetChat but it failed as it let me down at 9pm! My mistake was not to have a plan B.

 

 

I put a post almost every day on Linkedin and explain the benefits of a Twitter Chat:

 

I did the same for Twitter but could not explain the benefits of a Twitter Chat because of the limit on the number of characters.

 

 

 

 What happened during the Twitter Chat

I had 5 participants for my first Twitter Chat. As TweetChat did not work, I was multitasking between my MacBookAir and my iPhone.

  • I was staring at my computer assuming that nobody was writing anything because I could not see any chats, then I discovered that the iPhone refreshed quicker than my computer and that the chats were actually happening.
  • The chats are not necessarily in the right order on the iPhone.
  • Some people do not use the hashtags in their response so it is more difficult to track as a host.

Here are a few key moments from our discussion:

 

 

 

Here is a video about the Twitter Chat (there is no soundtrack):

 

[youtube]https://youtu.be/Y6YubjAFlvw[/youtube]

 

What I did after the Twitter Chat

I wanted to get some feedback on how I could improve:

 

I also answered questions:

 

I was very keen to write a blog about it so I did an online poll to get people’s opinions about the title:

 

 

Impact for my business after my first Twitter Chat

  • more people are reading my blogs
  • giving me more ideas for topics for my blogs
  • 2 people have contacted me to explore working with me

 

Want to find out more?

Join my #ManagingTeams weekly Twitter Chat on Wednesdays 9pm (BST), 4pm (EDT) 1pm (PDT), for ideas and inspiration to manage your teams. Next week the topic is: communicating values and goals

 

This blog on What I learnt from hosting my first Twitter Chat gives you an opportunity to think about how you can host a Twitter Chat. I dare you to start your own and you will see how great it is. Thank you as ever for stopping by. What do you think of what you’ve read? I hope it’s helpful if you are thinking of looking for an Executive and Leadership Coach who does virtual coaching. Feel free to comment below or Tweet me @NadinePowrie with any comments or email me at npowrie@nadinepowrie.com.

It’s good to talk. I’ve just opened up new offers for virtual coaching. This is in response to my current clients’ feedback. You may also be interested in my Masterclasses.

 

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